Max Shtein Receives Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists

Max Shtein Receives Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists

Assistant Professor Max Shtein

Max Shtein received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). Dr. Shtein is one of  67 researchers from across the nation to receive the award from the U.S. Office of Science and Technology Policy. It is the highest honor the federal government gives to early-career scientists and engineers.

He is an assistant professor in the departments of Materials Science and Engineering; Macromolecular Science and Engineering; and Chemical Engineering. He is also an assistant professor in the School of Art and Design.

Shtein was one of 15 selected by the Department of Defense. He is honored for developing novel ways to make the next-generation of energy-efficient lighting devices, displays and solar cells. His mentoring of underrepresented minority students at the high school, undergraduate and graduate levels is also noted in the award citation.

Shtein made key contributions in developing commercially-viable techniques for manufacturing organic light-emitting diodes, transistors and solar cells, which hold tremendous promise for efficient and cost-effective energy and lighting, among other applications. The techniques he helped to develop include organic vapor phase deposition and organic vapor jet printing.

Organic vapor phase deposition uses a stream of gas to deposit organic semiconductors onto other materials in an even and orderly manner, which results in a better-performing device. Organic vapor jet printing actually prints organic semiconductors onto other materials with little waste.

At Michigan, Shtein has focused on developing novel kinds of devices such as multifunctional textiles for energy harvesting, lighting and sensing, and on understanding the fundamental physical properties of organic semiconductor materials and organic-inorganic interfaces.

“I’m very surprised and very honored to receive this award,” Shtein said. “It is a carrot and a stick at once. I feel positive pressure from the award to think better and work harder.” Shtein also shares credit with the graduate students who have worked in his lab.